Second part of my photo-story about New York City.

New York. Part I


Central Park is the most visited urban park in the United States as well as one of the most filmed locations in the world (more than 20 movies and TV-shows). It opened in 1857 on 315 ha of city-owned land.
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In 1858, Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux, two soon-to-be famed national landscapers and architects, won a design competition to improve and expand the park with a plan they titled the “Greensward Plan”.
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Construction began the same year, continued during the American Civil War further south, and was expanded to its current size of 341 ha in 1873.
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The Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis Reservoir – originally and sometimes still known as the Central Park Reservoir – is a decommissioned reservoir in Central Park. The Central Park Reservoir covers 43 ha and holds over 3,800,000 m3 of water.
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Manhattan.
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The Statue of Liberty is a colossal neoclassical sculpture on Liberty Island in New York Harbor. The copper statue, designed by Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi, a French sculptor, was built by Gustave Eiffel and dedicated on October 28, 1886. It was a gift to the United States from the people of France.
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The statue is of a robed female figure representing Libertas, the Roman goddess, who bears a torch and a tabula ansata (a tablet evoking the law) upon which is inscribed the date of the American Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776. A broken chain lies at her feet. The statue is an icon of freedom and of the United States, and was a welcoming sight to immigrants arriving from abroad.
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Liberty Island is a federally owned island in Upper New York Bay, best known as the location of the Statue of Liberty.
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Ellis Island is an island that is located in Upper New York Bay in the Port of New York and New Jersey. t was the gateway for millions of immigrants to the United States as the nation’s busiest immigrant inspection station from 1892 until 1954.
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Between 1905 and 1914, an average of one million immigrants per year arrived in the US. Two-thirds of those individuals emigrated from eastern, southern and central Europe. The peak year for immigration at Ellis Island was 1907, with 1,004,756 immigrants processed. The all-time daily high occurred on April 17, 1907, when 11,747 immigrants arrived.
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The Milstein Hall of Ocean Life in American Museum of Natural History with 29 m-long blue whale model.
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Central hall in The American Wing in Metropolitan Museum of Art.
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Washington Crossing the Delaware is an 1851 oil-on-canvas painting by the German American artist Emanuel Gottlieb Leutze.
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The Shrine of St. Elizabeth Ann Bayley Seton is located in the Church of Our Lady of the Holy Rosary, a Roman Catholic parish church of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York at 7 State Street.
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Brooklyn (red) and Manhattan (blue) bridges.
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The Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum is a military and maritime history museum with a collection of museum ships.
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Alfred E. Smith Houses is a public housing development built by the New York City Housing Authority in the Two Bridges neighborhood of the Lower East Side of Manhattan. There are 12 buildings in the complex, all are 17 stories tall. It covers 8.80 ha, has 1,931 apartments, and houses an estimated 5,739 people.
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The Brooklyn Bridge is a hybrid cable-stayed/suspension bridge and one of the oldest bridges of either type in the United States. Completed in 1883, it connects the boroughs of Manhattan and Brooklyn by spanning the East River.
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Since its opening, it has become an icon of New York City, and was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1964 and a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark in 1972.
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The Manhattan Bridge is a suspension bridge that crosses the East River. The main span is 448 m long, with the suspension cables being 983 m long. The bridge’s total length is 2,089 m. The bridge opened to traffic on December 31, 1909.
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True New Yorker:)
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The New York State Supreme Court Building, originally known as the New York County Courthouse, at 60 Centre Street on Foley Square in the Civic Center district of Manhattan. The granite-faced hexagonal building was designed by Guy Lowell of Boston in classical Roman style and was built between 1913 and 1927, completion having been delayed by World War I.
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Columbus Park, formerly known as Mulberry Bend Park, Five Points Park and Paradise Park, is a public park in Chinatown. During the 19th century, this was the most dangerous ghetto area of immigrant New York, as portrayed in the book and film Gangs of New York.
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Today, the park often serves as a gathering place for the local Chinese community, where “the neighborhood meets up here to play mahjong, perform traditional Chinese music… [and] practice tai chi in the early mornings.”
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Canal Street.
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Piece of art.
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